003 - YOTA, Gilwell Park, England

Scheduled on 2017-08-08 18:38:37 UTC 82 deg

The Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) event happens every summer and offers a week-long range of wireless technology activities to 80 young people under the age of 26. The youngsters are all representing their national amateur radio societies and come from 28 countries located in IARU Region 1 (Europe & Africa). This year there will also be a visiting team from Japan.

The 2017 event takes place in the UK at Gilwell Park, the home of the Scouting movement, and includes a special event station GB17YOTA, a transceiver kit building workshop, some antenna building, an Amateur Radio Direction Finding (ARDF) contest and a Summits on the Air (SOTA) activation. The youngsters will be visiting Bletchley Park, the home of the Enigma code breakers, the National Radio Centre, and the Science Museum in London.

Because the event is taking place at the home of Scouting, there will be around 1000 Scouts on site and we hope to have some of them join us for the ISS contact.

Special callsign GB4YOTA will also be activated by ARISS for a special contact with one of the astronauts on board the International Space Station.

Students First Names & Questions:

1. Do any of you experiment with ham radio in your free time when you are not obligated to work up there?

2. Typically, how many ham-radio operators are there on the ISS?

3. For ARISS contacts, what frequency bands, and how much power is used to communicate with the ground stations?

4. What are some of the challenges with sending live HD video from space?

5. How important do you consider your interest in amateur radio to your set of technical skills?

6. What would you say to encourage YOTA attendees to continue with their interest in radio?

7. How important is the amateur radio/ham radio setup to ISS backup communications?

8. How do you maintain communications with the worldwide mission control centres?

9. How many different types of communication systems does the ISS have?

10. (ONLY IF HAMTV IS ACTIVE) Can you show us your favourite trick with a water droplet?

11. Do you experience any ionizing phenomena in space that affects the wave propagation in a POSITIVE or NEGATIVE way?

12. When using amateur radio/ham communication equipment in space, what kind of problems can cause difficulties How are these resolved?

13. We are talking via voice (and video?). Can you use other modes, such as straight CW-keys onboard the ISS?

14. What are the main differences between a contact with a ham ground station and a space agency ground station?

15. What are the differences between the HDEV (High Definition Earth Viewing) camera and HamTV?”

16. How many cargo supply ships are docked with the ISS at the moment and do they change the pattern of earth facing communications?”

17. How do you see the ham radio system developing in the next decade?

18. Does everything go according to plan or do parts break and need replacement. If so, do you have a repair facility on board?

19. In space, can you use social media and messaging with others in the same way we use it on Earth?

20. How does the oxygen and electricity production work on board of a spaceship?

21. In which direction do plants grow onboard the space station?

22. What do you do in case of a fire onboard the ISS?

 

Print